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Cornish pictures, video, information and chicks.

Cornish Information

cornish

 

Cornish

 

Egg Laying

1

Meat Production

3

Show Status

1

Aggressiveness

3

Broodiness

2

Space Needs

3

Bantam Version?

 Yes

Preferred Climate

 Any

 

Cornish Qualities

The Cornish functions as a single-purpose fowl bred specifically for meat production. It produces meat more efficiently than any other chicken and lays at the foundation of the commercial chicken industry worldwide. They reach a dressing weight of five pounds at five weeks. The Cornish lacks the typical hairy feathers left over after plucking other breeds—a fact which saves processors the energy and time of singeing the carcass prior to butchering. The breed shows little desire to forage and generally handles confinement well. A sad sight, most Cornish crosses used in commercial production cannot support their own weight and will either have broken legs or lameness.

Cornish Temperament

Cornish farmers describe the breed as loud and intractable. The roosters readily show aggression. The Cornish chicks at times manifest cannibalism. Health problems associated with their rapid growth prevent the kind of activity common to most chickens. The high feed conversion ratios give farmers a narrow margin of error in feeding. Underfeeding yields fowl prone to predation. Cornish farming works well in a commercial production under highly monitored conditions but will most likely fail in a backyard coop.

Cornish Appearance

The Cornish chicken presents as a broad, muscular fowl on widely spaced yellow legs. They manifest in three basic colors; Dark, White, and White Laced Red. The Cornish breed has short feathers that leave parts of the body bare. They sport a pea comb, no crest, and small wattles. Their protruding brow, piercing eyes, and curved beak support their reputation as a predatory bird. Most of the commercial growers breed Cornish with white feathers and yellow skin.

Cornish Upkeep

Feed carefully. Many Cornish cross breeds break their legs or grow lame as a result of their rapid weight gain. Ulcers develop in lame birds forced to sit in their own feces. Consequently, they require wire pens to keep their bodies away from ammonia rich feces. Cornish fowl fed too much can die of heart attacks. Those fed too little display predation. The backyard breeder would do well to stick to the hardier Cornish chickens or the new hybrid called the Colored Ranger rather than the commercial Cornish cross. Pasture the chickens as much as possible. Pen any who go lame. Move their run often to encourage exercise and discourage parasites. Provide a warm, draft free coop for these short feathered fowl.

Cornish History

One must distinguish between the Cornish chicken and the Cornish/Rock cross. Cornish chickens derives its name from Cornwall, England. The American Poultry Association recognized the Cornish chicken as a breed in 1893. They existed in England long before 1893. The Cornish/Rock, a genetic hybrid, comes from secret and scientific double-cross breeding techniques developed in the 1930’s. The backyard farmer cannot produce a Cornish cross by breeding a White Cornish with a White Plymouth Rock nor can he reproduce the breed by breeding the offspring from the commercial line. In essence the Cornish/Rock represent a hybrid chicken not a chicken breed. Cornish game hens sold in the supermarket are the commercial Cornish/Rock crosses butchered at two pounds.

Cornish Pictures

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Cornish Videos

Cochin pictures, video, information and chicks.

Cochin Information

cochin_hen

Cochin

Egg Laying

2

Meat Production

1

Show Status

3

Aggressiveness

1

Broodiness

3

Space Needs

2

Bantam Version?

 Yes

Preferred Climate

 Cold

Cochin Qualities

Cochins eat just about anything and suffer from the resultant obesity. Their large size, full plumage and heat-producing appetites equips them for the cold weather. Cochins only lay an average of two, medium brown eggs per week or 120 per annum. Cochins seldom fly or wander and forage little. Overall, the breed produces poorly in every category. They lay few eggs, mature slowly as a meat fowl, and succumb to metabolism, heart, liver, and fertility disease. However, what they lack in production, they make up in personality.

Cochin Temperament

Cochin owners describe their breed as peaceful, friendly, quiet, and easily handled. They seemingly like confinement and make themselves comfortable in any environment. Good pets, the Cochin do well in a backyard. They seldom cackle even when laying. The hens make great mothers. Breeders have even seen Cochin roosters feed and warm the chicks. Cochins have a submissive demeanor with all. Owners seldom choose Cochins for their production qualities. However, if one wants a chicken to love, choose a Cochin.

Cochin Appearance

Like a rabbit in the chicken world Cochin have the appearance of a big, fluffy ball of fur or rather feathers. Thick, downy feathers cover even their legs and feet. Cochin come in many colors: Black, Buff, Partridge, White, Barred, Brown Red, Golden Laced, Mottled, Silver Laced, Birchen, Blue, Columbian, and Red. The cock weighs eleven pounds. Hens typically weigh nine. The Cochin rooster has a medium-size, single comb with the usual five points but an unusually long third point. Hens have a very small single comb that follows the curve of their heads. Both the rooster and hen have long red wattles with matching oblong earlobes.

Cochin Upkeep

The feathers which make the Cochin so attractive also present several problems. Leg and foot feathering of the Cochin can cause mud balls which lead to frostbite or fungus. Confine them on wet days. Inspect your chickens often. Their feathers can hide small scrapes which easily succumb to infection in the moist environment of their downy feathers. The Cochin’s dense feathers can inhibit reproduction. Breeders either clip vent feathers or resort to artificial insemination. Finally, their plumage can lead to overheating. Keep your Cochins in temperatures below ninety degrees Fahrenheit. Monitor your Cochin’s feed and provide abundant greens to prevent obesity with its associated diseases.

Cochin History

Cochin gained immense popularity when presented to Queen Victoria in the mid 19th century. The Shanhai chicken later called the Cochin came from China. The Cochins inspired a phenomena called “hen fever” on both sides of the Atlantic and lead many to the keeping of chickens as ornamental show birds and pets. Early on Cochin existed only in the buff colors. In the US breeders developed a bantam version of the Cochin and several different color plumages in the standard size. The American Poultry Association accepted the Buff, Partridge,White, and Black varieties in 1874 followed by the Silver and Gold Laced varieties in 1965 and the Barred Cochin in 1982.

Cochin Pictures

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Cochin Videos

 

The History and Legacy of Cockfighting

cock fightMost days when you hear about roosters, chances are you probably first think about their ability to crow when the sun rises. That didn’t always used to be the case. Cockfighting, a sport where two roosters are thrown into mortal combat with one another, brings up the most horrible images to animal rights activists and really anyone who wants to see conditions improved for chickens. But just how far back does the practice go? It’s important to know more about what it is and what it means, so let’s take a look at the history and legacy of cockfighting.

Now, we’re not advocating for cockfighting in any way here. The practice is, without mincing words, absolutely inhumane and sickening to think about. Boxing is one thing as it requires a choice from both combatants. Cockfighting demands a chicken be raised with its sole purpose in life coming down to kill or be killed purely for entertainment. It should also be noted that cockfighting is illegal in the United States, Australia, Brazil, and the majority of Europe. Unfortunately, that doesn’t stop it from happening and in some countries it’s run via government control.

The life of a cockfighting rooster is not a glorious one to say the least. Typically, their wattle and comb are cut off to prevent freezing, as well as meet show standards. However, the goal is to raise a happy, healthy bird, otherwise it won’t stand a chance of winning you any money. Well, “happy” is the wrong word. They are raised to be content but extremely aggressive toward any other male chickens. The talons on the back of their legs may be removed, though more commonly they’re sharpened or replaced by metal spikes or razors, an act that can lead to injury and death for handlers as well.

Where the sport starts is still hazy, though it appeared in Ancient Greece between 524 and 460 B.C. However, it may even go back as far as the Indus Valley Civilization a thousand or more years prior to that. It was mainly big in Asia and remains that way, though the other big hotspot for cockfighting today is Latin America. The sport itself grew in popularity over time and became huge in both England and the United States, though it is currently banned in both nations.

The strange thing is, a lot of countries still engage in the practice due to a cultural reason, and even stranger is that there are places where a cockfighting match will be as popular as baseball or football. The activity itself isn’t entirely about just seeing two chickens peck and scratch each other to death but rather to experience some shared cultural event. It’s when illegal gambling is introduced that many nations have a problem.

Looking at the practice from a Westerner perspective, it’s hard to feel anything but anger at the thought. Then again, I’ve lived a different life with a different culture. I’m perfectly okay with eating a chicken sandwich, but raising roosters to fight to the death is something I can’t condone, and I’m sure many people out there would call me a hypocrite. It’s a touchy subject for most but it doesn’t seem to be going away any time soon, for better or worse.

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Avoiding Salmonella in Chickens

raw chickenOne of the greatest gifts a chicken can give is itself as a rich, delicious dinner. Sure, that may seem a bit weird, but it’s one of the primary uses chickens are bred for. However, there’s a downside to eating chicken if you don’t know what you’re doing. Prepared incorrectly, you could easily be dealing with a nasty case of salmonella. What is salmonella and how can you avoid it? Read on and find out.

Before learning how to prevent it, you might be interested to know what salmonella actually is. Salmonella is a bacteria commonly found in the intestines of animals, though we associate the bacteria with chickens more than any other creatures. Should you ingest the salmonella bacteria, you may suffer from salmonellosis, or salmonella poisoning. Symptoms include stomach cramps, fever, and diarrhea, typically presenting within the first 12 to 72 hours of ingestion. In most cases, the worst you have to worry about is constant diarrhea, but if the infected party is very young, very old, or has an auto-immune disease, it could be a lot worse.

So basically, this is something you want to avoid, yes? Though you could easily give up chicken, something vegetarians and vegans will tell you is not the end of the world, for most of us that simply isn’t an option we’d prefer. Thankfully, there’s a lot we can do to prevent salmonella from bothering us, all with some simple precautions.

First, when purchasing raw chicken from the grocery store, make sure not to keep it in the same bag as other foods or items. There’s a reason that stores provide extra plastic bags in the meat sections, plus you’d be hard-pressed to find a bagger that doesn’t know to keep any raw meats separate from fresh produce or things of that nature.

Next, when you do get home, make sure to stick your raw chicken straight into the freezer or the fridge if you plan on using it that evening. This seems like common sense seeing as how you don’t want it to spoil, but this also helps reduce the growth of the bacteria itself. To thaw the chicken then, put it in the fridge for six hours, place it in a bowl of cold water, or microwave it. Whatever you do, just know that once the chicken is thawed you shouldn’t refreeze it at least until it’s been fully cooked.

One of the biggest steps is the proper cooking procedure. With chicken, you want to make sure you’re cooking it to the point that the internal temperature is 165 degrees Fahrenheit or higher. This is the breaking point where salmonella can be killed, so if you can get it above that temperature, there is virtually no chance the meat itself can pose any threats. For the best results, make sure to use a meat thermometer on this step.

Lastly and possibly most importantly, everything that has come in contact with the raw chicken must be cleaned with soap and warm water. And this does mean everything, so your hands, any cutting boards, the counter, knives, tongs, forks, the meat thermometer, any and everything. Your hands especially carry the most risk, so flip on the water and wash for 20 seconds or more.

Salmonella doesn’t have to scare you away from chicken forever. There’s that small risk, yes, but if you take the time to dine safely, there’s no reason you can’t enjoy your meal free from the worry of bacteria. Happy dinner!

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Chickens Through History

chicken dionsaurBy this point in time, you’re more than aware what a chicken is, what it’s used for, and roughly where it comes from. You’ve also no doubt heard the debate about whether the chicken really came first of if it was in fact the egg. Well, we’re not talking about that today. Instead, we’re taking a look back to when chickens were first discovered and domesticated. Let’s look at chickens through history.

As with so many other animal species, we don’t know the precise time and place of the appearance of chickens as we popularly know them, but evidence suggests that an early form of the domesticated chicken, called a “manuk” (the word for domesticated), thousands of years ago in Southeast Asia. By the time the Lapita culture had formed between 1350 and 750 BCE, chickens were common domesticated animals along with dogs and pigs. It’s not until the 7th century BCE that we see any pictures of chickens appearing on pottery.

With the passing of time, the uses of chickens and its origins began to evolve here and there. The poet Cratinus called chickens “the Persian alarm” in the middle of the 5th century BCE, whereas Aristophanes’s comedy The Birds from 414 BCE calls them “the Median bird,” suggesting a definite introduction from the East (which falls in line with the manuk of Southeast Asia).

By the time the Romans were enamored with chickens, they were being used as oracles to predict the future, or at the very least give guidance. Yes, there was once a time when chickens were considered good options for assistance with important life choices. Everything was based on omens, so for instance a hen appearing from the left meant something very good whereas a chicken that flees its cage when fed is considered very bad.

The Romans would be the big hitters in chicken history for some time, even making some laws around them such as forbidding eating fattened chickens. Why exactly? Well that doesn’t seem to be very clear, especially since it didn’t get much of a foothold. People just though chickens were too delicious and actually ate pretty much every bit they could including the organs and even the pygostyle, the part of the tail where the feathers connect.

A Roman author named Columella took it upon himself to write up the eight book in his treatise on agriculture exclusively on chickens, specifically how best to raise them. He suggests the best size for a flock is 200 and even mentions a handful of breeds by name, thus noting some of the oldest breeds ever recorded (those being the Tanagrian, Rhodic, Chalkidic and Median breeds).

Leaving Rome, chickens were brought to Easter Island in the 12th century AD and served as the only domestic animal on said island for quite some time, other than perhaps the Polynesian Rat. The chickens that lived here were housed in stone coops, as opposed to the wooden coops that the Romans used and that we typically use to this day.

Chickens have come a long way between then and now. Currently, we have dozens of breeds and variations and use them for food, shows, and just company. Wonder what the future holds for the egg-laying fowl?

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Strange Chicken Anatomy

chicken faceWe can all draw a chicken with minimal effort by the time we’re in kindergarten, or at least picture one in our head. We can see their beaks, the red doo-dad that hangs from their neck. The other red doo-dad that comes out the top of their head. Um…yeah what the heck are all those things? Well, let’s stop for a moment and answer some of these questions about strange chicken anatomy.

Comb:

The red appendage that seems to sprout from the top of most chickens’ heads is called the comb and comes in a variety of shapes and sizes, some of which are the defining characteristic of the various breeds. You can find V-shaped combs, rose-shaped combs, buttercup-shaped combs, and even strawberry-shaped combs. They can also come as a single comb or be split.

But what’s really interesting is that the comb is used not just as decoration, but as a means of cooling the chicken off. Yup, those red parts on the top of the head are actually miniature air conditioners, to some extent.

Wattles:

The opposite of the comb is the wattle, the usually red appendage that dangles under the beak from around the chin. Like the comb, they come in a variety of shapes and sizes, sometimes being nearly absent altogether. They, too, function as a means of air conditioning and actually work in conjunction with the comb. Blood circulates between the wattle and the comb and in doing so, the chicken can be warmed or cooled. Plus, they just look cool!

Beak:

Chickens are birds, and birds have beaks. With chickens, their beaks are particularly small and built to peck and crunch smaller items, such as seeds and insects. The natural formation of a chicken beak is that of a point, though it’s common practice to perform what’s known as a “debeaking,” which isn’t actually removing the beak but rounding the tip out to prevent the chicken from harming other birds or its young. This is particularly common with hens used for breeding and egg laying.

Feet:

Again, since chickens are birds, they have talon-like feet. Most chicken breeds have feet and legs that are devoid of feathers, though some breeds, such as the Sultan, do actually have feathers throughout their feet and toes. There feet are shaped the way they ate to allow for the birds to easily scratch at the ground in order to stir up bugs. It’s just all part of the peckin’ and a scratchin’.

Chickens are rather unique farm animals and have a very iconic image. They may seem strange, but all those features are actually rather useful indeed!

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Is Chicken Healthier Than Other Meat?

chicken breastChicken is one of the most popular meat available these days in the grocery store and on the menu. Just about everywhere you go, you’ll find some dish that features chicken as the main component. Most of the time you’ll hear that chicken is much healthier for you than all other types of meat, but is that true? Well, let’s take a look at just why chicken is considered so healthy.

All meat, no matter what kind, has its upsides and downsides, chicken included. Regardless of nutrients, meat consumed as the one and only staple of your diet will lead to an increase in your body’s fat levels, as well as an increase in your risk of heart disease and diabetes. However, despite what you may believe, we don’t typically have diets that hinge entirely on meat. Rather, the common diets we assume are bad because of meat are actually bad because of reliance on grain.

Still, chicken does actually have a few advantages over beef in that it is significantly leaner on average and thus does not contain as many calories or calories of fat. With chicken being lighter, it also means that a little bit can go a long way, so a single cut of chicken can be stretched further in meals as opposed to a single cut of beef.

On the flip side, chicken runs a greater risk of salmonella when undercooked while beef, despite containing e coli, actually can be served in a more raw form. It’s a small advantage to mention, but that doesn’t include the truth behind beef’s superiority when it comes to pure vitamins and minerals. If you’re just looking at calories, pound for pound chicken is a better option, but if you want to pack your meal with things like iron and zinc, you’ve got to look at beef. The same goes for most vitamins, such as B12 and K, though chicken has more vitamin A.

It all rally comes down to the amount of calories you’re taking in. Moderation eliminates most food problems, and chicken is simpler than most to moderate well. Plus, it’s consistently cheaper when bought at stores.

In the end, it must come down to personal preference. Is it really healthier than beef? Well, yes and no. Is it delicious and nutritious just the same? Absolutely! Just remember though that you get the most nutrition from chicken when it isn’t breaded though! So eat with confidence and enjoy your chicken!

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Chickens In Common Sayings

chicken countingIf you’re like most people, you run across a handful of sayings each and every day. “A stitch in time saves nine.” “A penny saved is a penny earned.” You know, that sort of thing. But it’s somewhat interesting to note that chickens pop up quite a bit in popular idioms. Here are just a few instances.

Don’t Count Your Chickens Before They’ve Hatched:

Mothers love to dispense wisdom, and if there’s one bit of advice they love to give, it’s “don’t be stupid,” or more specifically, “Don’t get ahead of yourself.” Counting your chickens before they’ve hatched simply means it’s unwise to assume something before knowing the facts, similar to “It’s too good to be true.” Planning on a handful of chickens from a single clutch isn’t a perfect science as some chicks won’t hatch while others won’t make it to full adulthood. Therefore, don’t plan on the size of your flock until you can accurately count them.

Like a Chicken With Its Head Cut Off:

Something about random flailing generally brings this one out, though I’d argue that your actions and the typical response from a beheaded chicken are completely different. Basically, acting like a chicken with its head cut off implies that you’re making very little sense to the point of hysterics, usually with a lot of spastic body movements. However, it should be noted that some chickens have been reported as living quite a long time after having their heads cut off. Then again it’s most common for a headless chicken to just simply die, sadly.

That’s a Cock and Bull Story:

Why exactly a cock and a bull can’t be trusted is a bit odd, but the gist is that a cock and bull story is something completely full of lies. Some believe the origin of the saying comes from a pair of prominent inns that meet on the same street, but that, sadly, is also a cock and bull story.

He’s Pretty Cock-Sure:

Roosters are very passionate animals, typically showing no fear even in the face of something they very much should. When someone is cock-sure, it means that they will not back down in the face of anything, or that they’re just plain stubborn. Either way, there are worse things than being cock-sure, such as…

Stop Being a Chicken:

I’d much rather be cock-sure about a cock and bull story than to be a chicken. “To be a chicken” is to be afraid of something, usually something that you shouldn’t be afraid of like trying a new delicacy or raising chickens of your very own. Why exactly chickens have been associated with fear, particularly when the male of the species has already demonstrated that they’re synonymous with bravery and strong-headedness, it yet another mystery.

Chickens have permeated our language and taken hold of quite a few of our sayings, but this fascination with the silly birds doesn’t really make much sense, does it? Either way, it’s pretty clear that chickens will be staying with us for a very long time indeed.

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Gonzo and Camilla

gonzo and camillaWith a new Muppet movie finally hitting theaters and a whole new generation being primed for the motley puppet performers, there may just be a disconnect between what we know now and what we used to know. Perhaps one of the great mysteries of the Muppets, and indeed of the world, revolves around Gonzo, a supposed space alien, and the love of his life, a hen named Camilla. Why did Gonzo love a chicken so much? Well, let’s take a look.

Muppet continuity is a very tricky issue to discuss as there really isn’t one unifying threat throughout all Muppet-related properties, however it should be noted that the farthest back things can go would be Muppet Babies, the animated cartoon where all the Muppets were toddlers in a nursery. During this time, Camilla was not actually a chicken but rather a stuffed chick that Gonzo carried around with him everywhere. The only time she came alive was during points of the episode where imagination was used, but other than that she was nothing more than a make-believe friend.

The Muppet Show gave them a lot more to do, and more specifically it gave Gonzo a lot more to do in general with chickens. For some reason his character was set up not just as being in a long-term relationship with his chicken friend Camilla (or at least a long-standing infatuation), but a relative interest in chickens all around.

In fact, this desire for all chickens, not just Camilla, was a way for Jim Henson and his puppeteers to make things simpler on themselves as they frequently had a hard time telling Camilla apart from any other Muppet chickens. As a result, Gonzo would even remark that any chicken might be Camilla because they all look the same anyway. However, you can tell the difference as Camilla has blue eyelids, a feature unique to her.

Gonzo, despite stating that Camilla is the love of his life, doesn’t do a very good job of staying faithful though. Beyond having a hard time telling Camilla apart from other chickens, he also chases after Miss Piggy, which is strange enough seeing as how he clearly has a predisposition toward chickens and not pigs, though it may just be barnyard animals in general.

No matter why, Gonzo is still committed to a chicken (it doesn’t really matter which one). Why does he love chickens? Who can really say? One thing’s for certain though: Gonzo is one strange Muppet.

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Other Farming Fowl

ducks_and_chickensGeese:
Historically, geese have been bred and domesticated for meat. They despise being confined, and their love of good grass and the ability to forage makes them useful in a number of other ways. They are a hardy bird with a number of exemplary qualities. Some are even kept as guard-geese. They are an excellent bird for the small orchard farmer as they will clear up any windfall and get all the nutrition they need from grass throughout summer and fall. Geese are herbivores. You will get the best quality eggs and meat from a goose that is fed a plant filled diet.

Geese are excellent meat producers and egg layers. Just as in any bird, some breeds are better at this than others. The best layer, laying up to 80 eggs a year, is the Asiatic Swan goose. It is also very noisy and makes an excellent guard goose. The Embden is a heavy bird with a gander that can reach up to 34 pounds. They are excellent meat birds and lay up to 25 eggs a year. You should not, however, keep an Embden if you have small pets or children. Roman and Roman Tufted are excellent beginner birds with a great lay-rate, up to sixty eggs per season.

Goose eggs are in high demand for cooking, hatching and decorating. The shells are extra thick which makes them ideal for painting or other arts. The eggs are rich and filling and make excellent baked items such as cakes.

Fun Fact: Geese mate for life. Do not expect your Gander to accept another goose.

Ducks:
Ducks are excellent multi-purpose birds. They produce a large number of excellent eggs as well as being excellent meat birds. They also help keep your garden clear of those nasty slimy things known as slugs- they’re a duck delicacy. Ducks are divided, like chickens, into bantam, heavy and light breeds. Heavy breeds are the meat birds and light breeds the egg layers. Bantam breeds include the Call duck, named for it’s loud quack. It is an excellent pet but a poor layer and certainly not large enough for the dinner table. Bantams are also good flyer’s and need their wings clipped.

Indian Runner ducks are excellent layers, but prefer to roam (which I can attest to… my four love to run back and forth in their enclosure). The Campbell is another light breed which lays up to 300 eggs a year. Table birds include the Aylesbury. A pure Aylesbury is rare, and most that are sold as such are hybrid Pekin-types.

Be sure you don’t feed your ducklings medicated poultry feed. Give them a starter crumble and then grower’s pellets. Allow them to forage. They prefer to have a good amount of water to splash around in and need it to stay healthy. Try to steer clear of sharp stones as injuries to the feet can cause an infection known as Bumblefoot.

Eggs are smaller than goose eggs but larger than chicken eggs. They are highly sought after by cooks, especially bakers as the richness of the yoke makes an incredibly cake.

Fun Fact: You do not need more than one Drake for a flock as their libidos are high and can cause damage from too much attention.

Quail:
Coturnix Quail are becoming the most common and best loved of the small flock farmer. They are an excellent game bird and layer and require no more care and effort than chickens, but start laying sooner, produce more eggs, need less food, take up much less space, and are edible. They can even be raised in big-city apartments due to their small size. There are six varieties, the British Range, Tuxedo, English White, Pharaoh Di, Manchurian Gold, and Australian Speckled Fawn.

Quail require 40-50 square inches of space per bird, but can be kept in nearly any small animal cage. They require a 20-25% protein feed such as that found in turkey or game bird starter. If you can’t find these supplement with grains, sprouts and bugs.

Quail eggs can be served the same way you serve any other egg and a few other ways you can’t. Their meat is considered a delicacy and if you choose to go into production, you can make a fair amount on your birds.

Fun Fact: Cortunix Quail have a beautiful voice.

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