Category

Uncategorized

Category

Golden Comet Chicken Pictures and Breed Information

Golden Comet Information

Golden Comet Chicken

There is a breed of chicken known as the Golden Comet chicken. A golden comet chicken is not just an every day breed of chicken that you see pecking around in your yard. This chicken breed is actually considered a crossbreed between two other birds and is also referred too as a sex link breed. The golden comet chicken is created by getting a white rock hen and a New Hampshire rooster and mating them together. The resulting baby chick that comes from the two chickens is the golden comet chicken.

Golden Comet

Rating

Egg Laying

2

Meat Production

2

Show Status

2

Aggressiveness

1

Broodiness

2

Space Needs

2

Bantam Version?

no

Preferred Climate

Warm or Cold

Golden Comet History

The Golden Comet breed of chickens is actually a hybrid. They are bred from a New Hampshire rooster and a White Rock hen.

These chickens are known as sex link breeds which is a term that basically means crossbreed. Some other common names this breed goes by are Gold Sex Link, GOlden Buff, Red Star and, Cinnamon Queen.

Originating in the United States, this breed was developed as a commercial crossbreed. Hens can lay 250-300 brown eggs per year but often stop laying by age 2 due to old age related issues.

This breed is not part of the APA since it is a cross breed.

Golden Comet Qualities

Golden Comet Hen

As we stated above, golden comets are a smaller chicken breed only weighing four-six pounds on average. Below are a few of the other characteristics of a golden comet so you know what you are looking for when buying them so you can be sure to get the right type of chicken.

  • The hens typically weigh between three and four pounds when they are fully grown
  • Roosters grow to be between five and six pounds at full maturity
  • Their feathers are different shades of white and light brown and coppery red- giving them the nickname of cinnamon queens
  • Their beaks are a yellow/brown color
  • legs are always a bright yellow
  • the eyes are typically yellow and orange

Golden Comet Temperament

Every animal breed from dogs and cows right down to the humble chicken is known for their particular unique behaviors. For instance, when you think of dogs you think of happy pets that love to play fetch and cuddle up with you every chance they get. Cats are known for their stand-offish personality; they can be grumpy but when they are in the mood you can count on them to come to get in your lap and give you cuddle time.

Then you think about birds such as geese. Let’s be honest, no one really likes geese. They are known to have a more aggressive temperament and they always seem to hiss or get very territorial whenever people get too close to them.

So, what then is the temperament of a golden comet chicken like? From the experiences of most people, these chickens are actually a very laid back breed of bird. They rarely fuss or get riled up when they are picked up. They are actually very curious birds and if they know you as the person that takes care of them, then they are typically very friendly as well. Most owners or breeders find that if they treat their golden comet chickens well, they walk right up to them and greet them just out of pure happiness of seeing them there.

Golden comets have been known to live in harmony with other chickens, even those of a different breed. When they are put around chickens in a flock, they very rarely get involved in any type of scuffle, in fact they often try to get away from any conflicts as fast as they can. Hens from other breeds are known to peck or get in conflicts with one another from time to time, but it is very rare that you will find a golden comet hen in any type of scuffle with another hen.

They are the chickens that always seem to be trying to make peace with everyone else so the coop is a peaceful environment…at least that is what it looks like from a human perspective of course.

Golden Comets Around Children

As mentioned above, golden comets are a very gentle breed and have what is actually considered a very sweet and endearing personality. This means that this breed of chicken is a great choice for people who are either starting out to raise chickens and have never done it before or for the little kids that live in your house who you plan on having out in the coop with you learning how to handle the hens right along with you.

The comets are very gentle and do not easily get stirred up or rattled meaning your child can get in the coop and be a typical child and play, and for the most part the comet will take it in stride and not bother them. Most chickens out of this breed do not mind being man-handled and they are typically not territorial so if your child gets in their space you do not have to worry about them getting aggressive with your child. As long as you teach your child to be gentle and respect the space and life of the chicken, the Comet will, in turn, be gentle and respect your child’s space as well and there will very rarely be any problems.

Golden Comet Health

All chicken breeds will have the possibility of carrying worms, contracting lice (which can be spread to you if you do not care for them properly), and mites. However, the good thing about golden comet chickens is that in their first three years of life, they rarely have any real health issues other than the odd ones out. They were specifically bred to have a high production of life meaning they were bred to produce a lot of eggs. As a by-product of the way they were bred, the golden comets very rarely have a long lifespan. They typically only live to be about four-five years old or less.

Since they are a high-production breed, they most often pass away as a result of reproductive tumors, a condition found in hens known as egg yolk peritonitis, or another type of reproductive issue. There are very few other issues that they will pass away from or contract which means that they are a more low-maintenance breed of chicken than others that you could choose from.

Golden Comet Appearance

Golden Comets Roosting

Once this breed of chicken is born, the resulting male and female are very easy to tell apart. They have a distinctively different color as soon as they hatch out of the egg. The males and females look so different from the moment that they are born that you can 100% guarantee what you are getting. This is an important thing to know for people who only want a hen so that they do not end up with a crowing rooster by accident.

The color of the chicks ensures which of the chickens you are getting: a hen or a rooster in each flock. This aspect of this chicken breed alone makes them a very safe and constant breed to buy for yourself or someone else you know that raises chickens because it is almost an absolute certainty that they will not get what they are not expecting.

Sizes:

  • Standard Male: up to 9.5 lbs
  • Standard Female: up to 7.5 lbs

Golden Comet Upkeep

This breed of chicken is one that you can raise and take care of anywhere in the world really. No matter where you live, you can raise them in a way that they will thrive and do well. They are able to adapt very well and very quickly to just about any climate.

They can quickly adapt to cold weather as long as you do your part and make sure that you give them enough hay or straw in their coops so that they are well insulated. This will help them nestle down and their feathers keep them additional warmth so that they can generally survive even in the coldest of winters. In the wintertime or in climates that are typically cold, you will more than likely notice that your chickens do not perch on top of the roof like chickens are known to do. They are more likely to roost and sleep down in a bustle of hay or straw so that their feet and their legs are protected from suffering from frostbite.

If you are raising your golden comets in a cold environment then it is important to check and replenish their nesting area every day or at least a few days a week so make sure that they are properly insulated. Then, take time every day and check your chicken’s comb and make sure that there are no signs of frostbite.

They can also acclimate very well in hot and humid temperatures. They do well in the heat as long as they have enough water to help them stay hydrated. It is important to put a farm bath or a large shallow metal bucket of water into the coop so that they can splash in the water if they get hot and cool their core temperatures down.

One thing that is important to check on a daily basis is the condensation levels in the coop. Too much condensation can gather in a coop and grow mold or mildew which can lead to sickness and even death in the chicken. Make sure that you are monitoring the humidity and condensation levels in any coop to make sure your chickens are taken care of no matter what type of climate you are raising your chickens in.

For people who are just starting out on their bird-keeping journey or for those who have other farm animals to care for and not much extra time to put into caring for new chickens, one of the first questions that they will probably ask is how easy it is to take care of this chicken cross-breed. Golden comets are very low-maintenance for the most part. They take care of themselves and keep to themselves as long as there is food and water readily available.

They do not seem to mind or suffer when they are confined even if their coop is on the smaller side. They typically do very well in confinement when they have a place to roost and hay or straw to get comfortable in and as long as you ensure that the chickens can walk around and not be on top of each other. They also do well when they are allowed to be a free-range chicken. They typically enjoy walking free and pecking the ground foraging for their own grain and food. Their low maintenance ways make it easy to take care of them and allows you to have the freedom in knowing that they are fed and watered and will otherwise be happy little birds.

Golden Comet Noise Level

A lot of people are wary about getting a chicken, and a rooster in particular, because of the noise that they know they can bring with them. Of course, everyone knows just how loud and noisy a rooster can be, but hens are not known for being quiet either! Thankfully, golden comets are actually fairly quiet.

They are not known for being particularly noisy and are happy quietly roosting or grazing throughout the day. As they are very laid back, they do not mind being left alone to do their own thing as you live your life, and will not squawk or cluck loudly to get your attention as long as they are taken care of!

Golden Comet Egg Laying

Golden Comet Hen Laying Down

Since golden comets are not large birds, they were clearly not bred for the purpose of being a meat bird. They were actually bred for the specific reason of producing a high volume of eggs every time they go to lay eggs. Golden comet hens will typically go to lay at least 1-2 eggs every single day in her young peak laying years when she is most fertile.

Most hens can and will start to lay eggs when they are still fairly young birds themselves. They can start laying eggs when they are about sixteen weeks old. When they start laying eggs at this young age, their eggs are actually very small, and not typically the eggs that you harvest and use. As time goes by and the hen gets older and more mature, the eggs get larger. You will know when the hens are starting to get ready to lay their eggs when their comb turns into more of a pink color, they start to waddle more, and their feathers turn dark red. The change can actually happen very quickly and they can begin laying eggs fairly quickly.

The peak egg-laying time for a golden comet hen is from the point when they start to lay eggs and until they are about three years old. After they reach about three years of age, the hen will continue to lay eggs, but how many eggs they lay and how often they go to lay will slow down quite a bit. If you get used to having a lot of eggs or a good production, then you will need to always replenish your coop with younger hens so that they are making up what the older hens are no longer able to do.

Just as it is important to feed and take care of hens with any other breed, it is very important to take care of your golden comet hens. It is vital that you are giving them a good, healthy diet and plenty of water so that they stay hydrated. When they have the right nutrition and a lot of fresh water, then they are more likely to have better egg production.

If you notice that your hen is laying a good amount of eggs, and then see that their production starts to taper off then the first thing that you need to look at is what the nutritional value of the food your flock is that you are feeding them. If you are having a problem, then you might need to add some fresh vegetables to their diet and give them a better quality feed with more nutrition.

You can also add in oyster shells to their diet so that you can give them some additional calcium into their diet. A lot of times, that added calcium can also help boost the nutrients that they need and restore your golden comet hen back to giving you a good production.

Golden comet hens lay eggs that are typically brown in color on the shells and they are typically large or jumbo-sized in size. They lay eggs so well that this is definitely a breed that farmers use a lot of times to supply commercial large-sized brown eggs to grocery stores all over the world. Rhode Island Red chickens are the top egg layers in the world at this time, but the Golden Comet chicken comes in a very close second and gives them a run for their money for laying large, tasty, beautiful brown eggs.

Golden Comets for Sale

You may want to rush out and buy some colorful Golden Comet chickens to add to your flock. They are quite common and easy to find. You can buy chicks locally quite often, but we’ve also heard that Cackle Hatchery has them for sale. They have great reviews and many people have bought Golden Comet Chickens from them.

Golden Comet Photos

Golden Comet Chicks
Image Source: Chickensforbackyards.com

 

Large Golden Comet Chicken
Image Source: Chickensforbackyards.com

 

Golden Comet Grazing
Image Source: Chickensforbackyards.com

 

 

Golden Comet Videos



Conclusion

The golden comet hybrid chicken is a great chicken to have for commercial purposes such as to harvest and sell their eggs, or to have as pets or family farm animals. They will give you all the eggs you could need as long as you have some in the coop in their prime egg-laying years. They’re perfect for a small backyard and really do not require a lot of space for them to be happy.

People who have golden comets and spend time with them and take care of them like they should say that they really enjoy having them and the bond that they are able to build with them. People say that they are a delightful breed and a friendly type of bird to have around in general! If you are considering getting a new flock of chickens, the golden comet is the best way to go and you will love your new birds!
Jump to top

15 Amazing Chicken Toys to Keep Your Flock Happy and Healthy

Chicken Toys

Chickens and humans have a lot in common. Maybe not in the literal sense, but sometimes chickens get bored too and need to have something to stimulate their minds. Think about it. How would you feel if you lived your whole life locked up in a coup or small back yard with no form of entertainment?

Do chickens really need toys?

Chicken looking in a mirror

Yes, chickens need toys. Studies show that leaving your chicken without fun, or some engaging activity, can be counterproductive. Some of your chicken might develop health problems and may end up having bad behaviors. This includes feather pulling, bullying, cannibalism, egg-eating, and other negative behaviors. If you notice some of these happening with your flock, the chances are that they are just bored and just need a distraction.

10 Entertaining Toys for your Chicken Available on Amazon

Lucky for you, chicken farmers can find many toys available for sale on Amazon. All you have to do is visit their website, enter a search item, and wait for the results. It is that simple! The toys will vary in use, price, and design. In this section, we consider some of the best gadgets that you can buy on Amazon and other leading online marketplaces.

1. Vehomy Shredder Toy

The vehomy toy comes in two-packs with excellent colorful forage your flock will enjoy. They have a natural coloring matter to keep your pets healthy and happy. The loofah chewing toy is ideal for your playful pets because they can shred and chew them easily. Your little friends will have fun pecking and exploring the toy with their claws for long.

Features
The chicken loofah chewing toy is about 13.4inches high within the perfect reach of your chicken. They will enjoy pouncing on it several without it snapping. It has natural biodegradable materials and non-toxic paper. You can install it easily with a hook that suits your chicken cage. It is essential to look for a sizeable chicken loofah shred suitable for your flock for them to have a great time.

Pros
Your pets can consume the shredded paper without getting harmed. They will have tremendous fun chewing and experimenting with their claws and beaks. The product has exciting colors that will attract your bored pets from far to come and play.

Cons
They are not suitable for all chicken pets. Some may not love their thick shreds or their bright colors. You might consider reading your pet’s body language to ensure you get the right toys for them.

2. Bwogue Wooden Ladder

Your chicken will enjoy climbing this colorful ladder and some awesome perching with their claws. You will also love watching them jump on and off and getting a little swing. It is ideal for your playful pets since they can get a turn on the ladder and its party time in the chicken coup all over again.

Features
It has fantastic installations of wood, steel wire, and colorful buckles. Your chicken will have a great time jumping on and off the bright multicolored structure. It is easy to install in any cage and is of high quality. The colors on the wooden beads can wash off by water. Hence it cannot harm your pets when they try to peck. The buckles allow the ladder to be firm in a way that your little friends won’t pull it off.

Pros
Your chicken will exercise flying and swinging, and the coup is no longer monotonous for them. You might consider this colorful structure as an impressive decoration perfect for your chicks to jump on and off.

Cons
Your pets may find it uncomfortable for roosting or perching since it is not stable. It is too Shakey for big birds, so your grown-up pets can ignore it. Preferably it is not ideal for your pets to nap on since they can easily fall off.

3. Vehomy Chicken Swing

It will offer your birds timeless relaxation and incredible fun swinging, climbing, chewing, and playing. It has a suspension hook to allow your little friends to pump on the swing. The bells and the wooden beads will keep your pets in a playful mood for long hours.

Features
The vehomy chicken swing has natural wood and some colorful wooden beads that are durable and non-toxic. It has an impressive chain with hooks easy to install. The wood is around 11.8 inches wide and 1.2 inches thick, perfect for your large birds to perch and swing. It is essential to get a swing ideal for your pets as it varies in size and shape.

Pros
Your chicks and other small birds will have tremendous playful experience with the product for a long time. They can play with the colorful wooden beads without danger of getting chocked or poisoned.

Cons
The birds can chew off the bells, and they quickly fall off. Sometimes the large birds can have trouble jumping on and off the swing with their features getting stuck, and the wooden stick might be too thin for them to grasp on, among others.

4. Vehomy Chicken Toy With Mirror

The double mirror gives your pets an excellent playful experience with their reflection for hours. It has incredible bells and beak grinding stones, fun for your pets to play. For a single bird, the mirror will give it a friend to play with all day. The bells will provide excellent physical and mental stimulation to keep it in a playful mood.

Features
The toy has grinding porous mineral stones that have calcium enrichment to keep your pets healthy. The mirror is around 5.91 inches, and the grinding molar stones around 3.9 inches high.

Pros
It is ideal for all kinds of chicken breeds of all ages. The toy is an apt way of feeding your chicken some calcium, and you can hang other forage for them to shred using their beaks.

Cons
The mirror might be too small for the birds to notice, which can make them lose interest in the toy.

5. Portable Roosting Perch

It has various wooden multilevel sections around it where your pets will have fun perching and roosting. It is easily transportable, and you can put it in different parts of the cage for your girls to enjoy.

Features
The wooden toy comes in different sizes to choose from, according to the size of your flock. It is about 34 inches long, 12 inches wide, and 3 inches high. It will entertain your birds for hours. You can hang natural forage for them to consume or hang a swing or ladder to make the toy more interesting for them.

Pros
You can easily paint it to weatherproof it and make it long-lasting. It is easy to assemble and install.

Cons
It might not suit all kinds of flocks since some could be small for large chicken birds, hence of little or no entertainment.

6. Little Red Hen Treat Spiral

The toy has a hanging spiral for veggies and chicken treats your pets can enjoy. It keeps your treats clean and dry to maintain the health status of your pets. It has high-quality steel free from rust.

Features
The spiral steel dimensions are 6.5 inches wide and 11 inches high. It is durable, easy to use, and clean. It has large spacing enough for your pets to enjoy the treats. You can paint spray the product to make it weatherproof.

Pros
You can achieve more with the toy that is feeding your flock and entertaining them. You can hook some bells to keep them physically and mentally stimulated to play in the cage.

Cons
One toy may not be enough for a considerable size flock, hence install a few in their cage.

7. Cricket Cage


The cricket cage has perforations that the crickets will sneak out through. Your chicken will have a tasty snack, one after the other, and will have fun trying to reach for the crickets, and this can go on for a couple of hours.

Features
It is 6inches tall with flexible end caps and robust and long-lasting wire. The tube can easily roll, and the pets can get to eat some crickets crawling out of the small holes.

Pros
It can serve any size of flock since the crickets are just for fun.

Cons
Some large crickets will not crawl out the small perforations, making it difficult for your pets to play.

8. Pet Chicken Treat Ball


The treat ball is ideal for hanging corn or veggies for snack time. It has a bell to stimulate your chicken by keeping them in a playful mood. The pet treat ball will keep the vegetables and other treats sanitized to improve your pet’s foraging behavior. It will entertain our flock with its round shape as it swings.

Features
The product has rust-free metallic parts that can quickly get paint sprayed to it weatherproof. It is 6 inches long, 4 inches high, and 4 inches wide. The ball is durable, easy to clean and install. It has an impressive chain that suspends it over your flock, for them to chew and ring the bell playfully.

Pros
The toy can serve a large size of flock since it is just for fun. They can enjoy scrambling and swinging the ball for quite some time.
Cons
The product cannot fit some forage you would like to put, such as a large cabbage head, among others, .which is a disadvantage since you will be required to refill the fodder more frequently.

9. Chick-N-Veggie Treat Ball


The chick-n veggie treat ball is a good source of entertainment for your flock since it can quickly roll on the ground. You can fill it with all kinds of greens to stimulate your pets’ foraging behavior. It is comfortable to open, close, and clean.

Features
It is 7 inches long, 7 inches wide, and 12 inches wide. It is easy to spray it to make it weatherproof. The wire is of high quality and durable, free from rust. It can fit a large cabbage head. Your little friends will enjoy shredding.

Pros
You can suspend it with a string or hook. It can entertain a large size of the flock at once. The chicken can have lots of fun pushing it around and eating the lettuce.

Cons
It might get soiled by other coop materials, which could make your pets to lose interest in it.

10. Lixit Feeder Toy


The Lixit feeder is perfect for providing snacks for your chicken. The toy has a unique design that you can pull apart to open and stuff mealworms, lettuce, among other treats, then close. It is fun to play with as it rolls on the ground. Besides, your pets will enjoy pushing it and feeding off the treats.

Features
It is round for your chicken to chase it around the cage for a snack. The toy is resistant to damage by weather, and the chicken cannot quickly peck it. The paint used is non-toxic without any use of glue, making it healthy and safe for your pets to play.

Pros
The product can serve a large size of the flock. It is a perfect toy for your little friends during the winter since it is plastic. The color of the toy is attractive, making it easily visible for your little friends to play.

Cons
It can quickly get dirty and filled with unwanted stuff such as other dust, dirt chicken droppings, and other materials as it rolls over the ground. Such can be unhealthy for your pets to consume. Your little pets are also apt enough to open it up and eat the treat, and this could expose them to long hours of boredom.

5 Fun DIY Toys for Chicken

diy chicken toys

Not everybody has the money or the willingness to buy their bird’s toys all the time. After all, some of these toys might get broken rather quickly. Luckily, there are some excellent alternatives that you can use. Here are some fun DIY toys that you can make right at home.

1. Chicken wire balls

Naturally, chicken is a curious animal. So when they see a ball rolling inside the coop, they will want to know that it is! Chicken wire balls offer a safe and durable way of keeping your flock entertained. A chicken wire ball is easy to make and can hold a large crowd of birds treated for days. Besides, most of the materials are available at your dearest dealer store.

Here’s what you need:

Chicken wire.
A set of Plies (or any other wire cutting tool)
A sizeable amount of treats for your little birds.
A strong string.

Heres what to do:
The process is simple! All you have to do is tie the ends of your chicken wire together fill it with a generous amount of treats. You can use the string to hang the toy in the cage. For best results, it is better to attach the toy just above the chicken’s eye level. You can make as many toys as you like.

2. Groundball homemade toys

Groundball toys are another fun alternative to buying toys for your chicken. The idea is to have your chicken chasing a ball around the coop. in return, they get treats and other goodies that the ball might drop. (It is chicken soccer with no teams, of course). The downside to this toy is that the coop needs to be dry. Otherwise, the ball might get dirty and lose its intended purpose.

Heres how to make it:
First, you need a web ball toy (like the one commonly used in dog toys)
A bunch of herbs and other goodies for your chicken

Heres how to make it:
It’s super easy! Just stuff your ball toys with plenty of herbs and toss it in the coop.
Watch how your chicken gets excited, chasing it around.

3. Corkscrew chicken toys

The corkscrew chicken toy is a beautiful addition to your collection of chicken toys. The product is well suited for chicken living in coops or freelance chicken in your backyard. It is super easy to make and can serve you for a long time with no repairs or the need to create a new one.

Heres what you need:
An old corkscrew.
A strong string.
A large vegetable or fruit ( preferably a cabbage head or an apple.)

Here’s how you make it:
It’s rather simple. All you have to do is look for a suitable location. Tie your string in the corkscrew, and fix it into the cabbage head.

You can then tie the other end of the string in the coop and watch your chicken try to reach the cabbage head. Just make sure it is not too high. Otherwise, your flock may have a difficult time trying to reach the last bits of their treat.

4. Suet blocks

Suet blocks are an excellent addition to your collection of chicken toys. Well, they are not toys but are much more like a combination of edible seeds and plants. Chicken can have plenty of fun, just pecking at the stuff for hours. You can attach them to your swings and other toys for an added effect.

Heres what you need;
(nothing much really, all you have to do is visit your local dealer and ask for some suet blocks)

Heres how you make it;
Gently attach your blocks to other pieces or toys such as the chicken swing. Watch as your birds try to peck off the seeds and other bits.
You can also attach them to coop corners and other accessible spaces for your chicken to enjoy.

5. The chicken swing

The chicken swing is a classic toy for your birds. It’s super easy to make and requires only a string and a rod. You can find this toy in most chicken coops. The idea is simple. Chicken love to feel movement under their tiny feet, almost as if they are flying.

Heres what you need:
A stiff rod made using plastic, wood, metal, etc.
A long and durable string.
Cutting tools such as scissors
Decorations (optional)

Heres how you make it:
Cut the string into two equal sizes and tie each end to either side of your rod.
Attach the decorations (if any) to your desired points of the string to the rod.
Look for a stable location in your coop and tie each string on an exposed plank, or any other space that seems suitable for holding a swing.

Last, you can watch how your chickens react to their new toy.

Tips for Selecting the Best Toys for Your Chickens

chicken toy food ball

Choosing what to get your chicken can be a difficult choice. There are several factors to consider. For example, if you are in a region with extreme weather such as snow, mud, dust, having a ground-based toy may not be the best choice. Here are some tips for selecting the best toys for your chicken.

  • Cost: You need to consider the value of your toys. Some toys are more expensive when compared to others. You can make some DIY toy options from readily available materials at home or from your nearest dealer store.
  • Durability: Chicken owners, should consider the durability of some toys. Although most toys an take a few hits, some are vulnerable to breaking, snapping more than others. You must weigh your options correctly and go for the most durable alternative.
  • Sustainability: Some toys are more sustainable than others. You need to consider how long some toys last. For example, a cricket ball may be fun, but once the ball exhausts all the crickets inside, your chicken might become disinterested and leave it as a pile of junk. Some toys, such as the chicken swing, might last a long time with no replacement.
  • Attractiveness: Chicken just love colors. Toys with more attractive color decorations might have a more significant impact on your flock. If you are looking for something to entertain your flock, a beautiful toy might be your best choice.
  • Size of your flock: Some toys are ideal for smaller numbers of chicken. For example, if you are keeping chicken as pets, you might find it easier to buy toys that fit the numbers. A farmer rearing chicken in their backyard might prefer toys that favor more significant numbers. For example, the suet blocks may be a viable option for more substantial numbers of chicken.
  • Health impact: Chicken, will eat almost anything. However, just because they eat anything does not mean that everything is healthy for them. For example, plastic toys may sometimes break, leaving small bits of plastic that the chicken can ingest by mistake. As the adult in the coop. (pun intended) you have a responsibility to ensure that you provide your flock with healthy toys that don’t negatively affect your chickens.

Conclusion

So there you have it! Chickens sometimes need to play. After all, work with no play. Well, you get the idea. Only in this case, the chicken not only become dull but look for other ways to occupy their time. You can help reduce the growth of bad behaviors among your flock by letting them spend their energy constructively.

Just make sure your chickens play in a safe space free from predators, pests, and other disturbances that might negatively affect their mood. Motivated chickens are highly productive, so don’t act surprised when you notice a few improvements in the performance of your flock after getting them some new toys.

12 Chicken Sounds & Noises – Understand Their Meaning

Understanding chicken sounds takes time and training. As with any other species of animals, chickens have a language that’s all their own. It may be hard for humans to understand it at first but by paying attention and being in tune with your chickens, you can gain a pretty good idea of what chickens are trying to communicate. Whether a hen is getting ready to lay her eggs or there is danger approaching, there is no denying the distinct differences in the message that is being sent from the chicken to the owner. No matter how loud or annoying the sounds may be, there is a purpose for each unique noise and we will discuss a few of them here.

Distinct Chicken Sounds and Their Meanings

There is power in listening. By taking a moment to decipher the noise of your chickens, you will be able to recognize what your chicken is communicating and what they need from you.

rooster sounds

1. The Egg Song

One of the more common sounds is when hens are preparing to lay their eggs. There are a variety of noises that will come from the hen house before, during and after a hen lays her eggs. When chickens are waiting for a nest box, there may be agitated sounds of grumbling if they find their favorite nesting box is occupied. Usually, the sounds quickly end when the more dominant hen gets her desired box. Some hen owners have reported that their hens make a “Bawk Bawk” sound. Others have stated that the sound is more of a “bokbokBagok” sound. After a hen deposits her eggs, other hens join in on the egg song as a form of celebration.

2. Coop Noises

chicken coop sounds

Roosters are not the only chickens that rise and shine with a loud good morning. Chickens will make noises in the morning as well. The sound resembles that of a regular “Cluck Cluck”. The morning noises are a bit rambunctious and are a chicken’s way of saying how do you do to each other and you. In the evening the sounds are a bit more subdued and a reflection of the chickens winding down for the day.

3. Broody Growls

This sound is a very distinctive way a chicken will tell you to back off. After a hen has laid her eggs, she will sit on them and wait for them to hatch. If a hen feels threatened or agitated, she will growl at you warning you to get away. The growl is similar to that of a dog’s growl and can turn into a full-blown tantrum if the message is not received. If the growl doesn’t inspire an individual to go away, the hen will puff up her feathers and peck at you to leave. A broody hen will also display the same behavior when she has to leave her eggs to grab a bite to eat or a drink. If she is away from them too long, she sends a broody growl letting the others know to get out of her way so she can get back to her eggs.

4. Happy Murmuring

chicken hen noises

Chickens will make soft peeps and trills to show contentment. If they are hanging out and grazing, they will make these noises to send out signals to the others that are in earshot of each other. This confirms that everyone is happy, safe and doing their own thing.

5. Predator Alerts

These sounds of panic can be slightly different in tone and pitch but they all mean the same thing – danger. High loud shrills are usually common for roosters to issue a predator warning. It is not uncommon for a dominant hen to alert the group as well. These sounds could be a singular noise, a piercing call or an elongated bellow. A caution call is more repeated tones that do not signal imminent danger, but it is a warning that chickens send to each other informing them to be alert. The stronger repeated cackles signal a predator is nearby and to be on the lookout. The final predator alert is the air raid noise that sounds most alarming and is the sound that will get you out of your chair and straight to the coop. This noise is extremely loud and signals that the flock is in imminent danger. Most often, it will signify that a raccoon has gotten into the coop or that a hawk is circling overhead.

6. Food Signals

When food is near, all of the hens will know. Chickens will make a series of dull clucking noises to notify the others that the food has arrived. This noise is associated more with tastier meals such as mealworms. A hen will use this noise to let her chicks know that she has found food for them.

7. Roosting Calls

roosting calls

When it is time to go to bed, roosters will give succinct and loud calls letting everyone know it is time to go to bed. Depending on the breed, some roosters will walk around the coop until all of the hens are safely inside. Even though the sounds are loud, they are low pitched and repetitive.

8. Mating Invitations

The low, deep and rumbly sounds are a sign that a rooster is ready for action. This sound is an indication he is ready to mate. Coupled with him circling the hen with his wings flicking on the ground, the sound is a tale sign that love is in the air. If a hen doesn’t see the rooster approaching, she will emit sharp cries of surprise. Don’t be taken by surprise if you see this type of activity several times a day.

9. Distress Calls

A distress call doesn’t always mean there is the presence of a predator. A sharp squawk noise is an indication that a chicken has been pecked or injured. If a chicken has been captured and is being taken away from the flock, they can emit a long and high pitched cry

Parenting and Chick Noises

There are certain ways a mother communicates with her babies. Whether a chick is still in the egg or they have hatched, a mother is constantly communicating with her young chicks.

10. Chicks in the Eggs

Just like a mother talks to her baby while she is pregnant, a chicken will also communicate with her chicks while they are still in the eggs. The chicken sound is done quietly through clucking and purring. It is usually done while the chicken is sitting on the eggs waiting for them to hatch and is a way for the young chicks to become familiar with mommy’s voice. When the young chicks are in their final stage of incubation, you can hear them communicating back.

11. The Baby Chicks

black baby chicks

The communication between chicken and baby chicks continues after the young chicks have been hatched. The soft purrs of mom’s voice teach the baby chicks about the pecking order, and how to eat, drink and bathe themselves. A mother will slow her chatter if she finds that one of her young chicks are not learning as they should.

12. Baby in Distress

There are certain chicken sounds young chicks make when they are in distress. The sound of a distressed chick is frantic peeps notifying mom that something is wrong. When a chicken hears this noise she will rush to rescue her young chick. If a chicken senses danger near her flock, she will emit a soft “grrrrrrrr” or a low pitched clucking sound to let her babies know to be still or come to her for safety.

How Can I Keep My Chickens Quiet?

quiet chickens

There may not be an obedience school for chickens but there are certain tactics an owner can use to train them to be quiet. A simple spray bottle filled with water is an excellent way to train your chicken to be quiet. This tactic would be used the same way you would with a dog. Every time a chicken begins their rant, tell the chicken to stop and spray it with the water. They should relate the unpleasant spray with the action and stop.

Some chickens are a little harder to break. A method that is more effective with tougher chickens is a water hose. When the chicken noises begin, spray the hose at the chicken. This should discourage any further noises.

Since roosters tend to make more noise than hens, it may be better to stick with hens only. There are some cities and towns that have restricted the ownership of roosters to only one rooster or none at all. Having a hen-only flock can significantly reduce the amount of noise.

Another way for a quieter existence with chickens is to soundproof the chicken coop. Typically, wood is used for a coop’s construction. You can consider other materials such as brick or stucco. Building a brick structure and lining the interior with stucco is a great way to soundproof the coop and keep enough ventilation for the chickens.

What Are the Quietest Chicken Breeds?

white chicken hen

Believe it or not, chickens do have the ability to be quiet. Some breeds are inherently quiet. You don’t have to worry about the unpleasant noises at 6 am or the nasty looks from the neighbors because of loud chicken noises.

Buff Orpington
This breed of chicken is great meat birds and egg layers. They have calm and friendly personalities and are considered true pets. They like to be picked up and cuddled and are not afraid to wander to you for attention.

Rhode Island Reds
This breed has a docile and quiet personality. While they are not prone to cuddling, they are easily trained and get along well with other breeds of chickens.

Wyandottes
This chicken breed is the most common for owners in suburban areas due to their quiet nature. They lay eggs nearly year-round and come in a wide variety of different colors.

Barred Rock Plymouth
While this chicken breed is quiet, they are very friendly and outgoing and are not afraid to interact with humans. They lay large brown eggs and are considered a favorite among farmers and homeowners with small to moderate-sized farms.

Bantam
This quiet breed lays smaller white eggs and has an exceptional maternal Instinct. They’re often used as sitters for the Rhode Island Reds who are considered poor sitters.

Brahma
This breed of chicken is considered the “King of Poultry” due to its enormous size. Their weight ranges from 10 pounds up to 18 pounds. This breed is considered dependable white egg layers between October through May.

Cochin
This quiet breed is considered a Heritage Breed. They are mediocre layers but have superb maternal and surrogate skills.

Australorp
Known for their peaceful, calm and very quiet personalities, this breed is good for laying and sitting.

Java
This breed of chicken has a dignified and quiet personality. They tend to do best in a small flock environment and are dependable layers and average sitters.

Ameraucana
This breed is known for having a quiet, calm and docile personality. As long as they do not feel threatened, they are easy to handle. They lay medium-sized light blue eggs and have an average weight of approximately 7pounds.

Wrapping Things Up…

Birds have their language and way of communicating. Even though there are some breeds of chicken that are quieter than others, there is a need for them to communicate at some point. All birds will make some type of noises throughout the day to vocalize how they are feeling or if they are in danger. As a chicken owner, it is important to be able to decipher what those noises mean to guide you in how to take care of your flock.

Malaysian Serama Bantam Chicken Pictures and Breed Information

Serama Information

Malaysian Serama Bantam Chicken
The Serama or Malaysian Serama is one of the smallest chicken breeds in existence. This results in quite small eggs and not a whole lot of meat. In fact, most people tend to keep the Serama as an oriental or pet chicken. We’re going to take a look at a few different aspects of this bantam breed, including their qualities, appearance and history. They make a great addition to any backyard flock as long as you aren’t trying to keep them for large eggs or meat.

Serama Rating

Egg Laying

2

Meat Production

2

Show Status

2

Aggressiveness

1

Broodiness

2

Space Needs

2

Bantam Version?

Yes

Preferred Climate

Warm

Serama History

The Serama breed can be tracked all the way back to the 1600s, but the current strain of the bird comes from around the 1970s from Wee Yean Een. They come from the Malaysian province of Kelantan. Wee Yean Een gave them the name Serama as praise to one of the Thai kings of the time, King Rama. A man by the name of Jerry Schexnayder was the first one to import the breed to the United States, which happened in 2000. Unfortunately, the Asian Flu almost wiped out the entire breed, but they were able to survive.

A few years later, Schexnayder formed the Serama Council of North America, which created the standards and guidelines for the breed. They weren’t imported into the UK until around 2004 and they were a mix of Asian and North American Seramas. The way the breed was born was by cross breeding various Japanese bantams with the bantams that were local to Malaysia. This results in the birds having attributes of both types of bantams, so they don’t have one specific color or pattern.

Serama Qualities

The Serama Bantam chicken has quite a few great qualities. Not only are they extremely friendly and loving, but they make very good pets. Since they are a cross-breed, there’s not a specific color or style they have. This means you might have multiple birds that all look different. They lay very small eggs and usually lay around 5 eggs a week. To help you visualize how small the eggs are, it would take 5 Serama eggs to equal the a normal sized egg.

They aren’t great for meat because they are so small. They also have quite a bit of muscle that makes them have tougher meat. While there are specific class standards, the breed is considered a true bantam. This means there aren’t any standard versions and you never know what style or color you might get. They were accepted into the American Poultry Association’s Standard of Perfection for the first time in 2011.

Serama Temperament

The great thing about the Serama breed is that they are very friendly and loving. They love following their owners around and might even jump up into your lap for love. They can be quite assertive but are relatively easy to handle because they are calm and have great personalities. As a result, many people choose to keep them as an inside house pet. One thing to remember is that the roosters can be quite aggressive, so you shouldn’t keep more than one housed together. This is especially true if they are fighting over the attention of the females.

Females can become quite broody and are known to be fantastic mothers. Keep in mind that you don’t want to let them sit on more than 4-6 eggs because their small size makes it hard for them to cover them the way they need. Overall, the Serama has a huge personality and shows a lot of love for their humans and flock-mates alike.

Serama Appearance

The Serama breed is a very tiny bird. In fact, they usually have a height between a little under 6 inches to just below 10 inches. In terms of weight, they usually don’t get any bigger than around 19 ounces. They look like an upright V and their tails also stand straight up. As a result, they look like they are always on guard or alert, so they’ve been given the nicknames toy soldiers or fearless warriors. Both the comb and wattles are single and red. In hens, they tend to be a lot smaller than the roosters. The eyes are a bay red color.

They are muscular and their wings almost touch the ground. They have a full breast, medium to long yellow legs and 4 toes that have feathers covering them. They come in many different color options and they have 4 standard sizes: micro, class A, class B, and class C. Each class has different sized birds, but the smallest are in micro and the largest is in class C.

  • Micro: Males-up to 13 ounces; Females-up to 8 ounces
  • Class A: Males-under 13 ounces; Females-under 12 ounces
  • Class B: Males-under 16 ounces; Females-under 15 ounces
  • Class C: Males-under 19 ounces; Females-under 19 ounces

Serama Upkeep

These little bantam chickens are extremely easy to take care of. For starters, they don’t have a whole lot of health issues you need to watch out for. The biggest issue results from a gene from the Japanese bantam. If the bird has the gene, about 1/4 of their chicks won’t hatch because they have shorter legs that don’t allow them to get into the hatching position.

You need a very small area for the birds because they are tiny birds. While they do great in confinement, they do enjoy foraging and scratching the ground for food. Remember, whole pellets are too large for them to eat, so they need to be crushed or fed crumbles. Another thing to remember is that they have a lot of issues staying warm during colder weather. While they should be kept in warmer climates, they can do fine in colder areas as long as you make sure the coop is warm and well-insulated.

Serama Chickens for Sale

You may want to rush out and buy some cute Serama chickens to add to your flock. They are quite expensive and hard to find. You can buy chicks locally quite often, but we’ve also heard that Feather Lover Farms has them for sale. They have great reviews and many people have bought Serama chickens from them.

Serama Photos

serama chicks

 

Serama Hen

Serama Rooster

Serama Videos




Cornish pictures, video, information and chicks.

Cornish Information

cornish

 

Cornish

 

Egg Laying

1

Meat Production

3

Show Status

1

Aggressiveness

3

Broodiness

2

Space Needs

3

Bantam Version?

 Yes

Preferred Climate

 Any

 

Cornish Qualities

The Cornish functions as a single-purpose fowl bred specifically for meat production. It produces meat more efficiently than any other chicken and lays at the foundation of the commercial chicken industry worldwide. They reach a dressing weight of five pounds at five weeks. The Cornish lacks the typical hairy feathers left over after plucking other breeds—a fact which saves processors the energy and time of singeing the carcass prior to butchering. The breed shows little desire to forage and generally handles confinement well. A sad sight, most Cornish crosses used in commercial production cannot support their own weight and will either have broken legs or lameness.

Cornish Temperament

Cornish farmers describe the breed as loud and intractable. The roosters readily show aggression. The Cornish chicks at times manifest cannibalism. Health problems associated with their rapid growth prevent the kind of activity common to most chickens. The high feed conversion ratios give farmers a narrow margin of error in feeding. Underfeeding yields fowl prone to predation. Cornish farming works well in a commercial production under highly monitored conditions but will most likely fail in a backyard coop.

Cornish Appearance

The Cornish chicken presents as a broad, muscular fowl on widely spaced yellow legs. They manifest in three basic colors; Dark, White, and White Laced Red. The Cornish breed has short feathers that leave parts of the body bare. They sport a pea comb, no crest, and small wattles. Their protruding brow, piercing eyes, and curved beak support their reputation as a predatory bird. Most of the commercial growers breed Cornish with white feathers and yellow skin.

Cornish Upkeep

Feed carefully. Many Cornish cross breeds break their legs or grow lame as a result of their rapid weight gain. Ulcers develop in lame birds forced to sit in their own feces. Consequently, they require wire pens to keep their bodies away from ammonia rich feces. Cornish fowl fed too much can die of heart attacks. Those fed too little display predation. The backyard breeder would do well to stick to the hardier Cornish chickens or the new hybrid called the Colored Ranger rather than the commercial Cornish cross. Pasture the chickens as much as possible. Pen any who go lame. Move their run often to encourage exercise and discourage parasites. Provide a warm, draft free coop for these short feathered fowl.

Cornish History

One must distinguish between the Cornish chicken and the Cornish/Rock cross. Cornish chickens derives its name from Cornwall, England. The American Poultry Association recognized the Cornish chicken as a breed in 1893. They existed in England long before 1893. The Cornish/Rock, a genetic hybrid, comes from secret and scientific double-cross breeding techniques developed in the 1930’s. The backyard farmer cannot produce a Cornish cross by breeding a White Cornish with a White Plymouth Rock nor can he reproduce the breed by breeding the offspring from the commercial line. In essence the Cornish/Rock represent a hybrid chicken not a chicken breed. Cornish game hens sold in the supermarket are the commercial Cornish/Rock crosses butchered at two pounds.

Cornish Pictures

cornish_chick

cornish_hen

cornish_rooster

Cornish Videos

Cochin pictures, video, information and chicks.

Cochin Information

cochin_hen

Cochin

Egg Laying

2

Meat Production

1

Show Status

3

Aggressiveness

1

Broodiness

3

Space Needs

2

Bantam Version?

 Yes

Preferred Climate

 Cold

Cochin Qualities

Cochins eat just about anything and suffer from the resultant obesity. Their large size, full plumage and heat-producing appetites equips them for the cold weather. Cochins only lay an average of two, medium brown eggs per week or 120 per annum. Cochins seldom fly or wander and forage little. Overall, the breed produces poorly in every category. They lay few eggs, mature slowly as a meat fowl, and succumb to metabolism, heart, liver, and fertility disease. However, what they lack in production, they make up in personality.

Cochin Temperament

Cochin owners describe their breed as peaceful, friendly, quiet, and easily handled. They seemingly like confinement and make themselves comfortable in any environment. Good pets, the Cochin do well in a backyard. They seldom cackle even when laying. The hens make great mothers. Breeders have even seen Cochin roosters feed and warm the chicks. Cochins have a submissive demeanor with all. Owners seldom choose Cochins for their production qualities. However, if one wants a chicken to love, choose a Cochin.

Cochin Appearance

Like a rabbit in the chicken world Cochin have the appearance of a big, fluffy ball of fur or rather feathers. Thick, downy feathers cover even their legs and feet. Cochin come in many colors: Black, Buff, Partridge, White, Barred, Brown Red, Golden Laced, Mottled, Silver Laced, Birchen, Blue, Columbian, and Red. The cock weighs eleven pounds. Hens typically weigh nine. The Cochin rooster has a medium-size, single comb with the usual five points but an unusually long third point. Hens have a very small single comb that follows the curve of their heads. Both the rooster and hen have long red wattles with matching oblong earlobes.

Cochin Upkeep

The feathers which make the Cochin so attractive also present several problems. Leg and foot feathering of the Cochin can cause mud balls which lead to frostbite or fungus. Confine them on wet days. Inspect your chickens often. Their feathers can hide small scrapes which easily succumb to infection in the moist environment of their downy feathers. The Cochin’s dense feathers can inhibit reproduction. Breeders either clip vent feathers or resort to artificial insemination. Finally, their plumage can lead to overheating. Keep your Cochins in temperatures below ninety degrees Fahrenheit. Monitor your Cochin’s feed and provide abundant greens to prevent obesity with its associated diseases.

Cochin History

Cochin gained immense popularity when presented to Queen Victoria in the mid 19th century. The Shanhai chicken later called the Cochin came from China. The Cochins inspired a phenomena called “hen fever” on both sides of the Atlantic and lead many to the keeping of chickens as ornamental show birds and pets. Early on Cochin existed only in the buff colors. In the US breeders developed a bantam version of the Cochin and several different color plumages in the standard size. The American Poultry Association accepted the Buff, Partridge,White, and Black varieties in 1874 followed by the Silver and Gold Laced varieties in 1965 and the Barred Cochin in 1982.

Cochin Pictures

cochin_chicks

cochin_pullets

cochin_rooster

Cochin Videos

 

The History and Legacy of Cockfighting

cock fightMost days when you hear about roosters, chances are you probably first think about their ability to crow when the sun rises. That didn’t always used to be the case. Cockfighting, a sport where two roosters are thrown into mortal combat with one another, brings up the most horrible images to animal rights activists and really anyone who wants to see conditions improved for chickens. But just how far back does the practice go? It’s important to know more about what it is and what it means, so let’s take a look at the history and legacy of cockfighting.

Now, we’re not advocating for cockfighting in any way here. The practice is, without mincing words, absolutely inhumane and sickening to think about. Boxing is one thing as it requires a choice from both combatants. Cockfighting demands a chicken be raised with its sole purpose in life coming down to kill or be killed purely for entertainment. It should also be noted that cockfighting is illegal in the United States, Australia, Brazil, and the majority of Europe. Unfortunately, that doesn’t stop it from happening and in some countries it’s run via government control.

The life of a cockfighting rooster is not a glorious one to say the least. Typically, their wattle and comb are cut off to prevent freezing, as well as meet show standards. However, the goal is to raise a happy, healthy bird, otherwise it won’t stand a chance of winning you any money. Well, “happy” is the wrong word. They are raised to be content but extremely aggressive toward any other male chickens. The talons on the back of their legs may be removed, though more commonly they’re sharpened or replaced by metal spikes or razors, an act that can lead to injury and death for handlers as well.

Where the sport starts is still hazy, though it appeared in Ancient Greece between 524 and 460 B.C. However, it may even go back as far as the Indus Valley Civilization a thousand or more years prior to that. It was mainly big in Asia and remains that way, though the other big hotspot for cockfighting today is Latin America. The sport itself grew in popularity over time and became huge in both England and the United States, though it is currently banned in both nations.

The strange thing is, a lot of countries still engage in the practice due to a cultural reason, and even stranger is that there are places where a cockfighting match will be as popular as baseball or football. The activity itself isn’t entirely about just seeing two chickens peck and scratch each other to death but rather to experience some shared cultural event. It’s when illegal gambling is introduced that many nations have a problem.

Looking at the practice from a Westerner perspective, it’s hard to feel anything but anger at the thought. Then again, I’ve lived a different life with a different culture. I’m perfectly okay with eating a chicken sandwich, but raising roosters to fight to the death is something I can’t condone, and I’m sure many people out there would call me a hypocrite. It’s a touchy subject for most but it doesn’t seem to be going away any time soon, for better or worse.

Related Articles

Chickens as Pets?
Chickens and Religion
Are You Raising a Cockatrice?
Simple Chicken Recipes
5 Excellent Egg Recipes
Fiction Fowls: The Good, The Bad, and The Chicken
Flying Chickens
Naming Your Dinner
Top 5 Long-Lived Chickens
Why Does the Rooster Crow?
How Smart Are Chickens?
Other Farming Fowl
Gonzo and Camilla
Chickens In Common Sayings
Is Chicken Healthier Than Other Meat?
Strange Chicken Anatomy
Chickens Through History
Avoiding Salmonella in Chickens
The History and Legacy of Cockfighting

Avoiding Salmonella in Chickens

raw chickenOne of the greatest gifts a chicken can give is itself as a rich, delicious dinner. Sure, that may seem a bit weird, but it’s one of the primary uses chickens are bred for. However, there’s a downside to eating chicken if you don’t know what you’re doing. Prepared incorrectly, you could easily be dealing with a nasty case of salmonella. What is salmonella and how can you avoid it? Read on and find out.

Before learning how to prevent it, you might be interested to know what salmonella actually is. Salmonella is a bacteria commonly found in the intestines of animals, though we associate the bacteria with chickens more than any other creatures. Should you ingest the salmonella bacteria, you may suffer from salmonellosis, or salmonella poisoning. Symptoms include stomach cramps, fever, and diarrhea, typically presenting within the first 12 to 72 hours of ingestion. In most cases, the worst you have to worry about is constant diarrhea, but if the infected party is very young, very old, or has an auto-immune disease, it could be a lot worse.

So basically, this is something you want to avoid, yes? Though you could easily give up chicken, something vegetarians and vegans will tell you is not the end of the world, for most of us that simply isn’t an option we’d prefer. Thankfully, there’s a lot we can do to prevent salmonella from bothering us, all with some simple precautions.

First, when purchasing raw chicken from the grocery store, make sure not to keep it in the same bag as other foods or items. There’s a reason that stores provide extra plastic bags in the meat sections, plus you’d be hard-pressed to find a bagger that doesn’t know to keep any raw meats separate from fresh produce or things of that nature.

Next, when you do get home, make sure to stick your raw chicken straight into the freezer or the fridge if you plan on using it that evening. This seems like common sense seeing as how you don’t want it to spoil, but this also helps reduce the growth of the bacteria itself. To thaw the chicken then, put it in the fridge for six hours, place it in a bowl of cold water, or microwave it. Whatever you do, just know that once the chicken is thawed you shouldn’t refreeze it at least until it’s been fully cooked.

One of the biggest steps is the proper cooking procedure. With chicken, you want to make sure you’re cooking it to the point that the internal temperature is 165 degrees Fahrenheit or higher. This is the breaking point where salmonella can be killed, so if you can get it above that temperature, there is virtually no chance the meat itself can pose any threats. For the best results, make sure to use a meat thermometer on this step.

Lastly and possibly most importantly, everything that has come in contact with the raw chicken must be cleaned with soap and warm water. And this does mean everything, so your hands, any cutting boards, the counter, knives, tongs, forks, the meat thermometer, any and everything. Your hands especially carry the most risk, so flip on the water and wash for 20 seconds or more.

Salmonella doesn’t have to scare you away from chicken forever. There’s that small risk, yes, but if you take the time to dine safely, there’s no reason you can’t enjoy your meal free from the worry of bacteria. Happy dinner!

Related Articles

Chickens as Pets?
Chickens and Religion
Are You Raising a Cockatrice?
Simple Chicken Recipes
5 Excellent Egg Recipes
Fiction Fowls: The Good, The Bad, and The Chicken
Flying Chickens
Naming Your Dinner
Top 5 Long-Lived Chickens
Why Does the Rooster Crow?
How Smart Are Chickens?
Other Farming Fowl
Gonzo and Camilla
Chickens In Common Sayings
Is Chicken Healthier Than Other Meat?
Strange Chicken Anatomy
Chickens Through History
Avoiding Salmonella in Chickens
The History and Legacy of Cockfighting

 

Chickens Through History

chicken dionsaurBy this point in time, you’re more than aware what a chicken is, what it’s used for, and roughly where it comes from. You’ve also no doubt heard the debate about whether the chicken really came first of if it was in fact the egg. Well, we’re not talking about that today. Instead, we’re taking a look back to when chickens were first discovered and domesticated. Let’s look at chickens through history.

As with so many other animal species, we don’t know the precise time and place of the appearance of chickens as we popularly know them, but evidence suggests that an early form of the domesticated chicken, called a “manuk” (the word for domesticated), thousands of years ago in Southeast Asia. By the time the Lapita culture had formed between 1350 and 750 BCE, chickens were common domesticated animals along with dogs and pigs. It’s not until the 7th century BCE that we see any pictures of chickens appearing on pottery.

With the passing of time, the uses of chickens and its origins began to evolve here and there. The poet Cratinus called chickens “the Persian alarm” in the middle of the 5th century BCE, whereas Aristophanes’s comedy The Birds from 414 BCE calls them “the Median bird,” suggesting a definite introduction from the East (which falls in line with the manuk of Southeast Asia).

By the time the Romans were enamored with chickens, they were being used as oracles to predict the future, or at the very least give guidance. Yes, there was once a time when chickens were considered good options for assistance with important life choices. Everything was based on omens, so for instance a hen appearing from the left meant something very good whereas a chicken that flees its cage when fed is considered very bad.

The Romans would be the big hitters in chicken history for some time, even making some laws around them such as forbidding eating fattened chickens. Why exactly? Well that doesn’t seem to be very clear, especially since it didn’t get much of a foothold. People just though chickens were too delicious and actually ate pretty much every bit they could including the organs and even the pygostyle, the part of the tail where the feathers connect.

A Roman author named Columella took it upon himself to write up the eight book in his treatise on agriculture exclusively on chickens, specifically how best to raise them. He suggests the best size for a flock is 200 and even mentions a handful of breeds by name, thus noting some of the oldest breeds ever recorded (those being the Tanagrian, Rhodic, Chalkidic and Median breeds).

Leaving Rome, chickens were brought to Easter Island in the 12th century AD and served as the only domestic animal on said island for quite some time, other than perhaps the Polynesian Rat. The chickens that lived here were housed in stone coops, as opposed to the wooden coops that the Romans used and that we typically use to this day.

Chickens have come a long way between then and now. Currently, we have dozens of breeds and variations and use them for food, shows, and just company. Wonder what the future holds for the egg-laying fowl?

Related Articles

Chickens as Pets?
Chickens and Religion
Are You Raising a Cockatrice?
Simple Chicken Recipes
5 Excellent Egg Recipes
Fiction Fowls: The Good, The Bad, and The Chicken
Flying Chickens
Naming Your Dinner
Top 5 Long-Lived Chickens
Why Does the Rooster Crow?
How Smart Are Chickens?
Other Farming Fowl
Gonzo and Camilla
Chickens In Common Sayings
Is Chicken Healthier Than Other Meat?
Strange Chicken Anatomy
Chickens Through History
Avoiding Salmonella in Chickens
The History and Legacy of Cockfighting

Strange Chicken Anatomy

chicken faceWe can all draw a chicken with minimal effort by the time we’re in kindergarten, or at least picture one in our head. We can see their beaks, the red doo-dad that hangs from their neck. The other red doo-dad that comes out the top of their head. Um…yeah what the heck are all those things? Well, let’s stop for a moment and answer some of these questions about strange chicken anatomy.

Comb:

The red appendage that seems to sprout from the top of most chickens’ heads is called the comb and comes in a variety of shapes and sizes, some of which are the defining characteristic of the various breeds. You can find V-shaped combs, rose-shaped combs, buttercup-shaped combs, and even strawberry-shaped combs. They can also come as a single comb or be split.

But what’s really interesting is that the comb is used not just as decoration, but as a means of cooling the chicken off. Yup, those red parts on the top of the head are actually miniature air conditioners, to some extent.

Wattles:

The opposite of the comb is the wattle, the usually red appendage that dangles under the beak from around the chin. Like the comb, they come in a variety of shapes and sizes, sometimes being nearly absent altogether. They, too, function as a means of air conditioning and actually work in conjunction with the comb. Blood circulates between the wattle and the comb and in doing so, the chicken can be warmed or cooled. Plus, they just look cool!

Beak:

Chickens are birds, and birds have beaks. With chickens, their beaks are particularly small and built to peck and crunch smaller items, such as seeds and insects. The natural formation of a chicken beak is that of a point, though it’s common practice to perform what’s known as a “debeaking,” which isn’t actually removing the beak but rounding the tip out to prevent the chicken from harming other birds or its young. This is particularly common with hens used for breeding and egg laying.

Feet:

Again, since chickens are birds, they have talon-like feet. Most chicken breeds have feet and legs that are devoid of feathers, though some breeds, such as the Sultan, do actually have feathers throughout their feet and toes. There feet are shaped the way they ate to allow for the birds to easily scratch at the ground in order to stir up bugs. It’s just all part of the peckin’ and a scratchin’.

Chickens are rather unique farm animals and have a very iconic image. They may seem strange, but all those features are actually rather useful indeed!

Related Articles

Chickens as Pets?
Chickens and Religion
Are You Raising a Cockatrice?
Simple Chicken Recipes
5 Excellent Egg Recipes
Fiction Fowls: The Good, The Bad, and The Chicken
Flying Chickens
Naming Your Dinner
Top 5 Long-Lived Chickens
Why Does the Rooster Crow?
How Smart Are Chickens?
Other Farming Fowl
Gonzo and Camilla
Chickens In Common Sayings
Is Chicken Healthier Than Other Meat?
Strange Chicken Anatomy
Chickens Through History
Avoiding Salmonella in Chickens
The History and Legacy of Cockfighting